Saturday, April 13, 2024
Homelife changesMake your career move an easy job

Make your career move an easy job

You know what has to be done, but it doesn't make it any easier. You've done all the research, asked all the questions and mulled over your options, and you know that moving on from your current company is the right thing to do.

You wince, imagining the look on the face of your boss and co-workers when you tell them. You're no longer an insider, but an outsider or—worse—a competitor. Even your relationship as friends could be compromised. It's stressful for everyone, but especially for you because ultimately it's your choice.

Joshua Hodge Photography | E+ | Getty Images

As you go through your morning routine on the day you're delivering the news to your company, every step seems more pronounced than it typically does. Maybe it's because you recognize it could be the last time you'll go through the paces exactly like this. Or maybe it's because the adrenaline has already notched up in anticipation of the discussions you're about to have with your boss and colleagues.

Read MoreWhat's cooking in the 401(k) test lab

Indeed, along with marriage, divorce, death and personal injury, changing jobs is consistently ranked as one of the most stressful things a person can do. That stress can be substantially reduced, however, if you're better prepared for what comes next. Here are three ways to make the most of your job transition:

1. Leave well. "It's more important to leave well than it is to start well," a good friend once told me. And it's true. You've already made a good impression on your new company—you got the job! But while you're heading on to new and exciting adventures, your former employer is left to deal with the rejection and cleanup from your departure.

Make it easier by offering to stay on for a reasonable period of time, but not longer. In most cases, shorter is better for all parties, as it reduces the awkwardness and hastens the healing.

Read MoreTime for boomers to sell and move on?

Part of leaving well is preparing to deal with impulsive counterattacks mounted consciously or unconsciously by your former co-workers. Especially if you brought or maintained client relationships, the words "I'm leaving" may magically transform you from friend to foe—but let that be their choice, not yours. Take the high road whenever possible.

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular